Tapioca, Cassava, Asparagus Cassava 

Is Tapioca Chef Mix Paleo?

When we start down the path of a Paleo lifestyle, it all seems relatively straightforward: eat like a caveman.  The longer we adhere to this natural diet, the more we may crave some of our old friends.  Remember the soft and chewy texture of bread?  The quick and easy convenience of simple carbohydrates?  Or what about celebrating yourself or your friends with birthday cake?  These are the reasons we see so many “alternatives” popping up in your local Whole Foods.   If you don’t want to “cheat”  your Paleo lifestyle with grain-based flours, you’re likely turn to things like almond meal, coconut flour and the subject of today’s post, tapioca flour.  But is Tapioca Chef  made with tapioca Starch paleo?

What is Tapioca Starch?

Tapioca goes by many, many names.  It’s yuca in Peru, cassava in Africa, and manioc in Brazil and Argentina. You might know tapioca in sweet and cloying pudding form, or as a slimy pearl in your Bubble (boba) tea.  Tapioca is native to Brazil, where it was likely first domesticated 10,000 years ago.  Interestingly, one of the varieties is poisonous when consumed raw, causing a cyanide reaction in the stomach but is completely safe when fully cooked. Nowadays, we are turning to this ancient root vegetable in its flour form as a safe option for those with gluten intolerances and for many following the Paleo diet.

 

Chef Peter’s TapiocaChef Mix

What it is: a root vegetable, the third largest source for carbohydrates in the world, and gluten-free.

What it isn’t: a grain, a legume, a potato, refined, processed, or unnatural.

Tapioca starch is created from the root of the cassava plant, which is native to South America and Africa. It is basically the same thing as tapioca pearls, which are commonly used for pudding, but tapioca starch has been ground into flour instead of whole pieces.  Tapioca starch or flour adds structure to gluten free baking, which if you’ve ever tried it, is difficult to do.  

With Tapioca Chef – Tapioca Mixt it is very easy to made thousands delicious meals

Is Tapioca Flour Paleo?

Tapioca flour is a tricky one, and much like other items on this site it ultimately depends on your personal Paleo choices.  For most people, Tapioca/starch and its byproducts are completely acceptable since it doesn’t fall into those categories of not to eat list.  You can use Tapioca Chef Mix to make tortilla-like crepes or pancakes to get a bread fix.  Others say it falls into a grey area, especially since it has almost no nutritional value.  We say go for it, as does Mark’s Daily Apple, as long as you consume in moderation.

If you’re looking for somewhere to purchase
Chef Peter’s Tapioca Chef Mix, try it HERE.

Tapioca is our Waffle Ingredients

Tapioca,  Hawaiian Cane Sugar, Vanilla, Xanthan gum

The Recipe

Hawaiian Tapioca Waffles (with Eggs)
Ingredients:
1 cup Hawaiian Tapioca Waffle Mix, 3 tablespoons butter, 1 cup of water, 2 eggs.
Method:
Heat waffle iron until it is very hot (ToastMaster).
In a Blender: add water, Hawaiian Waffle Mix, melted butter and eggs. Blend on medium speed until the dough smooth and creamy.
Pour the dough into a HOT waffle iron and bake for 10 Minutes for a super crispy waffle add 5 minutes more The amount of time will vary, depending on the waffle iron.

Hawaiian Tapioca Vegan Waffles (without Eggs)
Ingredients:
1 cup Hawaiian Tapioca Waffle Mix, 3 oil, 1.5 cups of water,

Method:
Heat waffle iron until it is very hot (ToastMaster).
In a Blender: add water, Hawaiian Waffle Mix, and oil. Blend on medium speed until the dough smooth and creamy.
Pour the dough into a HOT waffle iron and bake for 10 Minutes for a super crispy waffle add 5 minutes more The amount of time will vary, depending on the waffle iron. Remarks: for color add brown sugar)

Keep the Waffle Iron Hot Baby

Humans need Oxygen 

Human beings must breathe oxygen to survive, and begin to suffer adverse health effects when the oxygen level of their breathing air drops below [19.5 percent oxygen]. Below 19.5 percent oxygen air is considered oxygen-deficient.

Earth’s Oxygen Levels Are Declining And Scientists Don’t Know Why Forbes Magazine  SEP 27, 2016 @ 09:02 PM
Simple Chef conclusion a burning fire consumes Oxygen right? Automobil, Human and Animal Breathing adding to Oxygen consumption.    
Human beings must breathe oxygen to survive, and begin to suffer adverse health effects when the oxygen level of their breathing airdrops 

Oxygen and Human Requirements
21% Percentage of oxygen found in normal air.
19.5% Minimum permissible oxygen level.
15% Decreased ability to work strenuously.
12% Respiration and pulse increase.
After that Human life is Pau, Finish, Kapute

The Good News Plancton, Trees, Plants are producing Oxygen.
The bad news Ocean warming reduces planktons and Humans cutting down trees.

Let’s do some oxygen farming.
One acre of tapioca produces 50,000 pounds of starch one acre of grain yield 3,000-pounds meaning we have to deforest 15acrese of forest to achieve the same amount of starch.
We are in need of around 2,800 pounds of corn to produce a cuttle that weighs 1,250 to 1,350 pounds. This equates to 2.07 to 2.24 pounds of corn per pound of finished animal.

In other words one cattle one acre of forest.
The European nation importing the green of the tapioca plant to feed livestock.Farmers have started cultivating cassava, a root crop native to South America, in different countries cassava is cultivation is comparatively easier, cheaper and profitable than other cash crops.

o2_graphic_mlo_large
Tapioca

Bread-Dumpling-Pizza-Waffle-Pancake
Gluten

Almost indispensable for breakfast, convenient for lunch or afternoon snack and convenient for those who want a light meal, the bread is very present in the food routine. But it contains the protein gluten – present in the flour – the bread contributing to that end protruding belly.
The good news is that there is a replacement measure up: Tapioca.

Tapioca is an ally of the diet

Made with the extracted starch of cassava, tapioca is a type of pancake, typical of northeastern Brazil. The tapioca is a light dough, gluten-free, which has less than half the calories of a roll. Besides being convenient and versatile, this foodstuff is free of fat and sugar, provides more rapid digestion and has a lower sodium content than processed foods. That is, it is worth trying.

Tapioca

Very important Tapioca is for almost a Billion People 

The typical cassava shrub produces unassuming brown roots with snowy white or creamy colored interiors. A cassava crop is perennial—after maturing for at least eight months roots can be harvested for a few years. New plants grow easily from cuttings. The root is carbohydrate-rich, protein-poor and must be boiled, roasted, fermented or otherwise processed to tame compounds that can produce toxic hydrogen cyanide during digestion. Nevertheless, an estimated 800 million people worldwide eat cassava. In Africa 500 million depend on the root as their main staple.

Amazing Tapioca Benefits

Nutritional Value of Tapioca Flour
These include a very low level of saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium. It is also a rich source of dietary fiber, “good” cholesterol, and protein. Furthermore, tapioca contains members of the vitamin B-complex, including pantothenic acid, folate, and B6, as well as iron, manganesecalcium, copper, and selenium.

Nutritional Facts 1 cup 100 grams 
Total Carbohydrate 86 grams
As you can see, tapioca flour isn’t exactly nutrient dense. In fact, in a 1/4 cup serving, you can expect to get 26 grams of carbs and 2% daily value of iron. That’s it. It is a starch, plain and simple. The whole yucca plant offers more health benefits and vitamins, but when considering the starchy flour on its own, it has a similar nutrient comparison to white rice.

Health Benefits of Tapioca Flour
While there are not a lot of good things that tapioca flour does in the body, there are also not a lot of bad things, either. Tapioca flour is a hypoallergenic food that allows people with food allergies or restricted diets to still enjoy “fluffy” baked goods. Should I Eat Tapioca Flour? Is Tapioca Flour Paleo?

Tapioca flour, like other Paleo flour alternatives, is not something that should be the foundation of a person’s diet. Even Paleo baked goods can contribute to obesity, digestive problems, and other health issues when they become the primary source of food.
When baking with tapioca flour, as with other Paleo flours, it is best to follow Chef Peter’s  existing recipes. Tapioca flour works well for making things like Paleo versions of Pizza, Waffles Crackers, Tortillas and Crepes.

When it comes down to deciding whether tapioca flour should be a part of your Paleo diet or not, consider how carbs affect you and how many other Paleo flours or desserts you already consume. Since it offers little to no nutritional value, tapioca flour is by no means essential for Paleo living. It’s just one of the many options available.

Most of all Enjoy

Chef Peter